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20100921
20100921
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in disguise because it has forced us to double of rate of our productivity and have no doubt that inherent in our spirit the more enemies we have, the more united and hard we work. >> rose: mahmoud ahmadinejad for the hour. next. >> rose: mahmoud ahmadinejad, the president of iran, is back in new york city. the rituals of his yearly visit are now familiar. he speaks to members of the press, he holds breakfast meetings and a lot of other meetings at the united nations. he address it is u.n. general assembly. his strip often accompanied by developing events. this year was the release of american hiker sarah shourd while two other hikers-- shane bauer and joshua fatale-- remain in an iranian jail accused of espionage. iran has been sanctioned four times by the security council for its failure to comply with the u.n. nuclear investigative agency the i.a.e.a. the obama administration, europe japan and even some arab nations have followed with some additional sanctions. some are very clear that a military strike should remain on the table if the sanctions does not work. one of those is former pr
>> susie: good evening everyone, tom hudson is on assignment. jeff yastine joins us. the federal reserve kept its key interest rate at zero, but said it's ready to take action to boost the economy when the time is right. that announcement came today as the fed wrapped up its policy meeting in washington. susie, one thing that stood out at this meeting is the fed is getting more worried about inflation. the problem is, inflation is too low, and below what the fed considers acceptable. >> susie: that could be the catalyst for the fed to pump more money into the economy. so what will the central bank do next? suzanne pratt reports. >> reporter: two more meetings. one two-day event in early november, the other in mid december. that's the window the fed has left this year to boost the economy. but, whether the central bank eases monetary policy in the next few months depends on what happens with the economy. and, fed watcher dana saporta says it's clear now that policymakers have linked their next move to inflation, or more specifically, the lack of it. >> i think the fed is loath to use the
collapsed under its own way. it would have been used by thousands of pedestrians as they walked over to the main venue. now questions are being raised over the quality of construction. it was not meant to be this way. this was supposed to be india's coming out party, showcasing a global showcase. >> it is under control. we are doing our best. we are confident we will be able to complete the entire renovation and cleaning. >> but not everyone is convinced. some say unless india acts quickly, the event could be in jeopardy. bbc news, delhi. >> next tuesday, there will be a conference. that is not moving news in itself, but this one is north korea, and it is extremely rare. the last time it happened 30 years ago, it led to kim jong-il succeeding his father. there is insulation he is about to hand over to one of his sons. -- there is speculation he is about to hand over to one of his sons. >> this is an early confirmed photo of the sun, taken almost two decades ago. almost nothing is known about him except that he comes from a ruthless bloodline. the eternal president and his son kim jon
. >> to everyone making a difference, you help us all live better. >> nationwide insurance supports tavis smiley. with every question and every answer, nationwide insurance is proud to join tavis in working to improve financial literacy and remove obstacles to economic empowerment, one conversation at a time. nationwide is on your side. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. [captioning made possible by kcet public television] tavis: a few programming notes first. in just a few minutes, i will be joined by a the huffington post co-founder arianna huffington, and tomorrow, we have a team robbins and the plea he has written about the jamestown settlement. later in the week, philip seymour hoffman, who is making his directorial debut. on thursday night, the "house" star hugh laurie is here, and then we revisit a documentary on baseball. tonight, we begin our week with kathleen sebelius, former governor of kansas, the now, of course, serves as president obama note's secretary of health and human services -- serves as president obama's health and human services
. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> lehrer: today's vote in the u.s. senate means the ban on gays in the military will stand, at least for now. opponents of the ban fell four votes short today in their bid to break a filibuster. >> the vote was about whether to begin debating a military budget bill. it includeded language calling for repeal of don't ask don't tell. but the republican filibuster held and the measure stayed stalled at a vote of 56-43. >> the motion is not agreed to. >> lehrer: 60 votes were needed. it came down to a handful of senators including maine republican susan collins. she backs repeal of the 17-year-old ban on gays and lesbians serving openly in the military, but she opposed a limit on amendments. >> i think we should welcome the service of these individuals who are willing and capable of serving their country. but i cannot vote to proceed to this bill under a situation that is going to shut down the debate and preclude republican amendments. that too is not fair. >> lehrer: it was clear that most republicans opposed repeal of don't as
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5

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